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neumu
Wednesday, October 1, 2014 
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Cinematronic by Michael Snyder
Film
cinematronic
  Gloomy Sunday cinematronic
  director

Rolf Schübel

cast

Erika Marozsán, Joachim Król, Stefano Dionisi, Ben Becker

year

1999

rating rating cinematronic
  Aspects of the watchable romantic drama "Gloomy Sunday" reflect historical record, by addressing the impact of World War II, the Holocaust and the 1933 composition of a popular Hungarian song said to move depressed souls to suicide. But what gives director Rolf Schübel's film its persuasive quality is its vibrant cast and its delineation of a precarious love triangle torn by friendship and betrayal. In Budapest, Hungary, during the Nazi expansionism of the '30s, prosperous Jewish restaurateur Laszlo (Joachim Król) and his shapely, passionate hostess Ilona (Erika Marozsán) hire self-effacing pianist Andras (Stefano Dionisi) to play dinnertime melodies. In short order, Laszlo and Andras are sharing Ilona's affections. Overwhelmed and conflicted by his love for Ilona, Andras writes the song "Gloomy Sunday," which becomes a hit, but has a strange effect on listeners. The lovers continue their difficult mating dance, but it's complicated by Hans, a pompous German businessman (Ben Becker) enraptured by Ilona. When Hans returns to Budapest as a high-ranking Nazi officer, he still frequents his favorite eatery even though owner Laszlo is a Jew. The dilemma is obvious, but the outcome's a mild surprise, and parts of the film resonate like a haunting tune.  
cinematronic
cinematronic


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